Take the #KINDChallenge

Knowing at least 6 neighbors can reduce loneliness

Connect through acts of kindness and combat loneliness in your neighborhood


Now we’re asking neighbors everywhere to take the challenge.



Nextdoor has partnered with leading researchers on a first-of-its-kind global study looking into how small acts of kindness can reduce loneliness in neighborhoods over a four-week period.


Participants were asked to perform (COVID-19 safe) acts of kindness such as: 


     Have regular contact with a neighbor

     Show care and concern for a neighbor

     Help a neighbor

     Provide advice or helpful information to a neighbor

     Contribute to a larger neighborhood effort, action,  or activity

     Other


Small Acts of Kindness Reduce the Likelihood of Loneliness

What We Discovered

Knowing as few as six neighbors reduces the likelihood of feeling lonely and is linked to lowering depression, social anxiety, and financial concerns related to COVID-19.

Even the smallest actions, such as saying hello to a neighbor, increased neighborhood unity.  

Performing small acts of kindness for neighbors reduces the likelihood of feeling lonely and socially isolated.

Get Inspired

What can you do to combat loneliness in your communities? Here are some simple, actionable tips from mental health experts and advocates:

Whitney Goodman, LMFT

Silvy Khoukasian, Relationship Coach


  • Decorate your porch for the holidays and pin yourself to the Nextdoor Cheer Map.
  • Create a neighborhood library with free books neighbors can grab.
  • Drop off a note or care package for your neighbors who may be isolated.
  • Cook a little extra of your favorite dish to share with your neighbors.
  • Offer to pick up groceries for elderly or immunocompromised neighbors.
  • Gather and share emergency contact information with immediate neighbors.

Elizabeth Earnshaw, LMFT


Adrian Michael Green, Educator


  • Try small acts of kindness like shoveling your neighbor’s driveway or bringing in their trash cans.
  • Join a Nextdoor group in your neighborhood to look for volunteer activities or toy/holiday drives.
  • Create a feeling of connectedness with lanterns or candles in your window or front porch at night.
  • Establish a gratitude tree. String pieces of paper from the branches for neighbors to share notes of kindness.
  • Wave, smile back. Be friendly to those you haven't had a chance to meet - even if from a distance.
  • Don’t just do this seasonally, practice kindness always. You never know who is having a hard time.


Join Nextdoor and connect with neighbors to share your ideas. The possibilities nearby are endless...

Meet Nextdoor Neighbors

Neighbors around the world remind us that having a neighborhood to rely on is important. Connect with 6 neighbors today and start feeling the benefit now. Don't believe us? Check out these stories from neighbors like you



Shreya and Saffron - Boston, Massachusetts

Throughout the pandemic, 18-year-old Shreya Patel and her 16-year-old sister, Saffron, realized that many senior citizens may be feeling alone during this time of isolation. They wanted to help, so they began sending handwritten letters to seniors in assisted living facilities and care homes. That’s when they started Letters Against Isolation to match volunteers with seniors in elderly care facilities across the country. The group recruited over 600 volunteers on Nextdoor and in just 5 months Letters Against Isolation has sent 50,000 letters to seniors in the US and Canada!

Shannon - Sydney, Australia

Shannon moved to Sydney recently with her husband. With no family or friends in the area she found herself struggling with loneliness. Meanwhile, Shannon was also going through IVF. She later joined Nextdoor and organized a ladies lunch at The Mean Fiddler Pub in Rouse Hill. 15 women of all ages showed up to meet her. Since then,  she has formed deep friendships through Nextdoor, including her best friend who lives around the corner.  She found a group of women in her neighborhood to rely on who have been able to give her moral support  during her journey with IVF. 

Abraham - Alexandria, Virginia

When Abraham moved to a new neighborhood, he did not feel connected to his community and found it difficult to form deep bonds with neighbors. He knew Nextdoor would be an easy way to meet local folks in the area, so he posted a message asking if any men in his community would be interested in meeting up. Abraham was able to form a men’s club to combat loneliness and social isolation. He then started 30 Coffees in 30 Days with 30 Neighbors. The challenge is simple - have a coffee each day with one of his Nextdoor neighbors.

Has your neighbor done an act of kindness for you lately? Tell us about it here.

Meet The Experts

Dr. Michelle Lim

Prof. Julianne Holt-Lunstad

Prof. Pamela Qualter

Dr. Lim is a leading expert from Australia who specializes in the impact of loneliness on mental health.

Prof. Holt-Lunstad is a leading expert from the United States who specializes in social isolation and the influence of social relationships on long-term health.

Prof. Qualter is a leading expert from the United Kingdom who specializes in child and adolescent loneliness.

A message from our CEO

Read a note from Nextdoor CEO Sarah Friar: 

5 ways to reduce loneliness in your neighborhood

Support and Resources

Loneliness is a public health issue that deeply affects our mental health. If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis, please know there are resources available to support you. Here are just a few:

An international nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention, treatment, and cure of anxiety, depressive, obsessive compulsive, and trauma-related disorders through education, practice, and research. 


Visit: www.adaa.org


Connect2Affect is an AARP Foundation platform that provides information, resources and strategies to help increase social connection.


Visit connect2affect.org



Offering free 24/7 support for those in crisis, all via text. 


Text HOME to 741741 in the U.S. and Canada to connect with a trained Crisis Counselor. 


Text HOME to 85258 in the UK 



Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. Trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults. 


Call: 800-971-0016, 24-hours a day, 7 days a week. 



Offers free, confidential, and anonymous mental health screenings at mhascreening.org. Free public education materials and additional resources are available at mhanationa.org.




Currently links more than 245,000 Americans to service opportunities. The program has 3 components: Foster Grandparents, Senior Companions, and Retired and Senior Volunteers (RSVP). 


Visit: https://americorps.gov/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 


LGBT elders can call when they need peer counseling, information and local resources. Call 888-234-SAGE. The hotline is open Monday through Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight Eastern Time and on Saturday from 12 to 5 p.m. Eastern Time. Prefer to use email? Reach out at SAGE@GLBThotline.org. 


Visit: www.sageusa.org

Sign the Please Stay Pledge created by Born This Way Foundation and Find Your Anchor. 


Visit https://pleasestay.us for more information and resources.

The world’s largest suicide prevention and crisis intervention organization for LGBTQ young people. If you are a young person in crisis, feeling suicidal, or in need of a safe and judgment-free place to talk, call the TrevorLifeline now at 1- 866-488-7386.



The Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. Available in English and Spanish. 


Call 1-800-273-8255. 


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